Category Archives: Tips & Insights

Buying a Used Car? 10 Best Midsize Cars Under $15k

Are you a bargain shopper? A deal hunter? Then there’s a good chance you’re looking for a practical, midsize used car under $15k. From Toyota to Buick, Honda to Chevrolet, there’s a great midsize car on this list for you. Find a reliable and stylish used car on the list below and apply for a used car loan on myAutoloan. Here we go!

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Which midsize used car is best for you?

#1. 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid

Average Price Paid – $5,136*
MPG – 41 City, 36 Highway

If more space for the family and more money in the gas budget sound like big wins to you, then consider a used 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid. This smooth-riding hybrid sedan is a crowd favorite, boasting excellent safety scores, a sleek interior, and plenty of room for passengers. The one drawback? The 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid is short on trunk space, thanks to its battery pack.

Perfect for drivers who value… safety, fuel economy, and the environment.

#2. 2010 Mercury Milan

Average Price Paid – $4,958 – $6,316
MPG – 22 City, 29 Highway

The year 2010 is a good one for used vehicles! The 2010 Mercury Milan offers discerning drivers the athletic handling of a coupe or convertible, but the spacious interior of a family sedan. Unlike the 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid, the Milan boasts a big trunk, and it’s available in AWD with a V6 engine.  

Perfect for drivers who value… excellent safety ratings, attentive handling, and ample cabin space.

#3. 2012 Chevrolet Malibu

Average Price Paid – $7,367 – $9,649
MPG – 22 City, 33 Highway

Can you say “Malibu” without thinking of sunshine and palm trees? We can’t, and that’s one reason we love the 2012 Chevy Malibu. This cheery sedan offers slightly above MPG for its class, as well as quality handling and strong brakes. Drivers love the Malibu’s comfortable and expansive front seats, sleek interior design, and smooth ride.

Perfect for drivers who value… balanced handling, an accommodating interior, and great fuel economy.

#4. 2012 Honda Accord

Average Price Paid – $8,264 – $12,261
MPG – 23 City, 34 Highway

Honda Accords have almost a cult following, and for good reason: they’re amazing, especially the 2012 Honda Accord. Boasting excellent safety scores for its class, spacious seats in the front and back, and agile handling, the Honda Accord is crazy fun to drive for a midsize sedan. The 2012 Accord is also available in a coupe body style.  

Perfect for drivers who value… reliability, safety, and fun!

#5.  2014 Toyota Camry Hybrid

Average Price Paid – $13,110 – $14,228
MPG – 43 City, 39 Highway

The Ford Fusion Hybrid and Toyota Camry Hybrid are equal competition for one another. The 2014 Toyota Camry is known for its quiet ride, comfortable passenger space, and strong acceleration. This last feature is especially important, as hybrids generally have a reputation for lackluster, if not wimpy, acceleration. But the 2014 Camry Hybrid? It drives like a gas-only sedan.  

Perfect for drivers who value… the zippiness of a sedan, but the fuel economy of a hybrid.

#6: 2015 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid

Average Price Paid – $13,978 – 15,994
MPG – 36 City, 40 Highway

Wowee, does this car have some pep in its step for being a hybrid! The 2015 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid ranks in the middle of the pack when it comes to used midsize cars. It boasts comfortable seats, easy-to-use technology, and solid reliability. What’s more, this used car gets extra points for a a great warranty.

According to U.S. News & World Report, “Hyundai offers a long certified pre-owned warranty, and used models are often thousands of dollars less than comparable Toyota Camry and Honda Accord hybrids.”

Perfect for drivers who value… a snappy driving experience and the peace of mind that comes with a warranty.

#7: 2010 Mazda Mazda6

Average Price Paid – $4,786 – $7,093
MPG – 21 City, 30 Highway

Weren’t sure you could afford a car as stylish as a Mazda? Well, you can! The 2010 Mazda Mazda6 stands out from the crowd. With sleek styling that’s downright sexy, athletic performance, and a spacious trunk, the 2010 Mazda Mazda6 has a lot to be proud of. The only thing critics don’t love? The fuel economy. At 17-21 MPG in the city and 25-30 MPG on the highway, this Mazda’s fuel economy leaves something to be desired, especially compared to the Chevrolet Malibu and Honda Accord.

Perfect for drivers who value… sport performance and sleek styling. Zoom, zoom!

#8: 2014 Kia Optima

Average Price Paid – $10,363 – $16,174
MPG – 23 City, 34 Highway

According to U.S. News & World Reports, this sweet ride has one of the strongest base engines in its class. Tall riders may have trouble in the back seat, but they can hop in the front, can’t they? They’ll have plenty of space! The Optima’s limited backseat headroom is balanced by a nice interior, strong engine, and a smooth ride.

Perfect for drivers who value… a powerful engine at an affordable price.

#9: 2014 Subaru Legacy

Average Price Paid – $11,439 – 16,522
MPG – 18 City, 25 Highway

Love. It’s what makes a Subaru, a Subaru, and we’re in love with this Subaru! With standard all-wheel drive and a spacious cabin, you’ll be ready to hit the mountains anytime Mother Earth calls your name. The 2014 Subaru Legacy is one of the only midsize cars with standard all-wheel drive, which makes it an ideal ride for drivers who live in climates with unpredictable weather, snow, or ice.

Perfect for drivers who value… safety and the ability to confidently drive in rough weather.

#10: 2012 Buick Regal

Average Price Paid – $8,634 – $10,966
MPG – 19 City, 31 Highway

The 2012 Buick Regal has won multiple awards. It was voted the 2012 Best Upscale Midsize Car for the Money and 2012 Best Upscale Midsize Car for Families. What a combination! The 2012 Regal boasts a turbocharged engine, great fuel economy (eAssist model), a stylish interior, and a powerful turbocharged engine. Critics love its graceful design, smooth brakes, and luxury-style amenities for the folks in the front seat.

Perfect for drivers who value… the finer things in life, but for less!

Ready to shop midsize used cars?

The key to getting a good deal is shopping around, whether you’re buying a car, a house, or getting an auto loan! Find the best used car for you with help from U.S. News & World Report. And the best used auto loan? Turn to myAutoloan! Apply online with myAutoloan and compare up to four used car loan offers at once. You’ll choose the best loan for your needs, just like you’ll choose the best car for your needs.

*Average price paid based on 32536 ZIP code

What Does It Mean to Lease a Car?

You have to add a leased car to your auto insurance policy. You might have to make a down payment. And you’ll definitely have to make monthly payments on a leased car. Leasing a new car sounds pretty similar to buying a new car with an auto loan, doesn’t it? In a way, yes, but there are some important differences between the two. myAutoloan is here to explain!

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What is leasing a car?

When you lease a car, you do not own it. You do not have any ownership interest in the vehicle. You get to drive a (typically) new car for a few years and you only pay for the depreciation that occurs while you have the car, plus interest.

Leasing a car is a little like renting a car, but for a really long time. Think years, not a weekend getaway. You make payments for the use of the car over a certain time period, then return the car at the end of the period. Most car leases are for 2-3 years. When your car lease is up, you have the option to buy the leased car or give it back to the dealer and walk away.

Why do people lease cars instead of buy cars?

As you can see, buying a car outright isn’t the only way to get a new set of wheels.

According to data from Statista, 28.28 percent of the new cars in the U.S. were on lease in the fourth quarter of 2017. After they weigh the cars, many drivers choose to lease instead of buy. One option isn’t necessary better than the other. In the end, it all depends on your preferences.

Pros to car leasing

  • You can make a lower down payment
  • You could get a lower monthly car payment than buying
  • You can get the latest safety features and technology
  • You can drive a new car every few years
  • You have lower repair and upkeep costs since the car is newer and you’re under the factory warranty
  • From month-to-month, it can be less expensive than buying

Cons to car leasing

  • You can’t modify the car as you please
  • You have to keep  your annual mileage under a certain amount, typically 12,000 miles
  • If you drive hard and fast, you could face expensive wear and tear charges at the end of your lease
  • It’s expensive to terminate a lease early
  • Lease contracts can be confusing and filled with confusing lingo
  • You can’t sell the car or return it whenever you want

Can I lease a car?

Yes, you probably can! You will likely need to make a small down payment, less than the usual 20% of a car’s value if you were buying, and then make monthly payments per the terms of your lease.

Your monthly payments are likely negotiable. Search for carmakers’ “lease specials” and check out dealership websites to learn about special lease offers. You don’t need a perfect score in order to lease a car, but you might need a good one in order to qualify for a lower interest rate. Most low interest and “no down payment” lease incentives are reserved for drivers with admirable credit scores. A credit score below the mid-700s may not qualify.

Can I buy my leased car?

Yes, you can buy a leased car with help from myAutoloan! We can connect you with a competitive lease buyout loan that gives you the freedom to buy your currently leased car. Use the loan to buy your car at the end or before the end of your lease—it’s up to you. Get started by filling out our fast, secure, and cost-free application. You’ll be matched with up to four loan offers from real, verified lenders who are ready to do business with you.  

If you’d rather buy a car, we’re here for you, too. Get ready to buy a car and compare up to four auto loan offers in minutes on myAutoloan.

What’s the Best Age & Mileage for a Used Car?

You’re all about saving money, which is why you’re looking to buy a used car instead of a new car. You’re wondering, though… how old is too old? At what age are used cars more of a financial drain than an asset? The answer may surprise you. (Hint: To some degree, age is just a number.)

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Vehicle age, mileage & depreciation

How does depreciation work?

Cars depreciate. They lose value. Your goal is to buy a used car that’s already done its bulkload of depreciation. Is it possible? Sure is.

First, you’ve got to understand how depreciation works. Let’s say you buy a new car for $34,968, the estimated average transaction price for light vehicles in the U.S. in 2017, according to Trusted Choice Insurance.

As soon as you drive off the lot, the car is worth $31,121. That’s an 11% decrease in value.

When it’s time to celebrate your car’s first birthday, your car will have decreased in value by 25%. It’s now worth $26,226.

At three years old, your car’s value will have decreased by a whoppin’ 46%. It’s worth $18,882.

And five years later? Your precious ride is worth a mere $12,938. It’s value will have decreased by 63%.

Keep in mind that depreciation isn’t an exact science. Some depreciation factors can’t necessarily be measured in dollars and cents. A brand, color, or vehicle type can unexpectedly fall out of favor with the public, making a car that’s only one or two years old unattractive to many buyers.

Gauge the age. Find your sweet spot.

Buying a used car that’s juusstt the right age can help you beat the biggest slump in depreciation. Let another driver take the biggest hit so you don’t have to. According to various car buying and selling resources, including Edmunds, Consumer Reports, and U.S. News & World Report, the “right age” can vary greatly.

One to two years old – Edmunds recommends buying a car that’s one or two years old, driving it for three years, and then selling it before the next big price slump. This might be a good option for drivers who love having the latest gadgets and don’t mind maintaining a car payment.

Two or three years old – According to Consumer Reports, two- and three- year old used vehicles have already taken the biggest depreciation hit. Continuing ownership expenses, like insurance and taxes, are still a bargain, and you still get to drive a vehicle with most new modern amenities.

Up to 10 years old – After gathering data on depreciation, problems, and repair costs for cars from one to 10 years old, U.S. News & World Report found that even 10-year old cars cost more in depreciation than they absorbed in repair bills.

Whoa, whoa. Read that again. They found that even 10-year old cars cost more in depreciation than they absorbed in repair bills. That means to some degree, you don’t necessarily have to worry about a car’s age being a burden.

Their analysis shows that the best way to find the cheapest used car is to buy the oldest modern car that you can still find running and in good condition. For the best safety features, stick to cars that are 2012 and newer. That’s the year electronic stability control became mandatory for all cars.

In the end, U.S. News & World Report suggests “buying as old a car as you’re comfortable driving that’s in good condition and reflects diligent care form the former owner.”

With most modern, relatively well-maintained cars, age is just a number. Ah, thanks for the wisdom U.S. News & World Report.

Want specifics on a used car you’ve been eyeing? You can actually calculate the depreciation of any car using the car depreciation calculator. Just enter in the purchase price of the vehicle, it’s current age, and the number of years you plan on owning it. The calculator will tell you the annual, total depreciation and estimated value of your vehicle at the end of the ownership.

Consider maintenance over mileage.

If age is just a number, is mileage a big deal when buying a used car?

Most drivers average 12,000 miles per year. If the used car you’re looking to buy has far more average miles/year than that, start asking the owner or dealer questions. How and where was the car driven? Why so many miles? Was the vehicle regularly maintained during this time and do you have the service records to prove it?

Typical used car mileages

  • One to two years old: 12,000 to 24,000 miles
  • Three to four years old: 36,000 to 48,000 miles
  • Five to six years old: 60,000 to 72,000 miles
  • Seven to eight years old: 84,000 to 96,000 miles
  • Nine to ten years old: 108,000 to 120,000 miles

If the previous owner can show that the car has been continuously well-maintained, a few extra miles here and there doesn’t need to be a deal breaker. Like U.S. News & World Report said, the best way to find the cheapest used car is to buy the oldest modern car that you can still find running and in good condition “and reflects diligent care from the former owner.”

Find your best used car (and your best used car financing)

There is such a thing as the “used-car-buying-sweet-spot.” It’s just different for different drivers. Once you’ve found a used car you feed good about driving, whether it’s two years old or five, apply for a used car loan through myAutoloan. You’ll receive up to four financing offers and can choose the best finance rate for you.

Financing a Car: How We Help

When You Have Bad Credit

It may seem that financing a vehicle is an activity reserved for people with high credit scores and superior financial situations. While they may have a host of options available when it comes to getting that loan, you are not precluded from a financing plan due to a  low credit score.  Instead of creating a lot of frustration in your vehicle search or purchasing a sub-par vehicle, know that our company helps you to find a competitive vehicle finance loan for the car you want to finance.

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Understand Credit Scores and Vehicle Financing

In order to really understand the process, you should know some more about credit scores and vehicle financing.  Financing a car is essentially taking a loan out on the vehicle, and using the vehicle as security for a lender.  Being able to obtain vehicle financing before you ever go to the dealer is a really smart thing to do.  Getting multiple offers and having a choice of which one you want is even better!  If you have taken out loans in the past, you likely have gone through this process of “Waiting – more waiting – and wait a little more before anyone finally gives you an approval.  The lending entity evaluates your financial situation to determine if you present a risk when taking out a loan.  You just sit and wait.  People who have bad credit scores are sometimes denied loans because they are determined to be a higher risk.  However, www.myAutoloan.com  understands that situation can occur but that these situations do not have to define you.  What if you could get more than one offer, even if your credit is not the best?  What if you could choose a lender that would work with you and is competitive in rates that they offer?  You get where we are going.

Know Where to Turn

Applying for a loan at just any lender might not be the best idea because you may find that you cannot get approved or that you do get approved with extremely high interest rates because of your credit situation.  Filling out multiple applications also take a lot of time and is not efficient.  Instead of taking this potentially damaging path to vehicle financing, apply with one application and know that we have lenders available for people with bad credit.  How great would it be if you could get up to four offers within minutes?  We already know and understand that some individuals are not in the best credit situations, and we have numerous lenders ready to approve and offer you a competitive loan rate that will help you re-establish your credit.  You need not to worry about the fear of rejection – your chances are very good that we can find lenders willing to work with you for vehicle financing.  

Reduce the Fees

Even if you are working on getting your financial situation into better shape and have made progress, you probably don’t want to take any steps backward.  Getting a loan from a car dealership could mean that you end up paying all kinds of additional fees.  Instead of just paying back the loan and the interest, you have numerous fees added on so that the dealership is able to make extra money.  Going through this process is unnecessary when you can get up to four offers for auto financing – Having choice means that you can get a lower rate loan and put that extra money towards bettering your current financial situation.  Our business is not out to make things difficult, and you would see that if you apply.   We want to help you get a vehicle finance plan that works for your financial situation with competitive rates.

See the Options

With most online lenders, you may only receive only one vehicle finance option due to your credit situation, but by working with our company, our goal is to get you up to four offers that provide you with choices.  Think about it – You may receive up to four potential offers!  Then, you can take the time to review the offers to see which one fits best with your needs.  At myAutoloan, we work to provide you with an experience that someone with great credit experiences.  You should have the same great experience by working with us. You deserve to feel as though you are being treated just like everyone else and thus, having a positive experience is something that you can look forward to.

Better Your Credit

Taking out a loan also means that you have the opportunity to better your credit situation.  For example, by paying your monthly payments in full and on time each month, you can see your credit score go up and up.  You might worry that procuring a loan on a car is going to make your credit situation even worse, but it actually improve your credit status and builds your credit score each and every time that you make on time payments.  

If you have bad credit, you don’t need to delay looking for a car loan.  Instead, work with lenders who want to work with you.  Read more about the process and how to make it work for you by checking out this vehicle finance guide.  Good luck and make it happen!

Should I Buy a Convertible or a Coupe?

You’re not a fan of crossovers or SUVs. Definitely not a fan of minivans. You’re in the market for a new car and you know exactly what you want to buy: a sports car. More specifically, a performance car that makes you feel downright amazing. And hey, we don’t blame you! There’s science to back up the emotional and psychological power of performance cars.

In fact, Ford released a study in early 2018 that found driving a sports car ranks high on the list of things that make people happy. It’s even more enjoyable than kissing and “could be a valuable part of your daily wellbeing routine,” says psychologist Dr. Harry Witchel.

But you already knew how spectacular it feels to drive a sports car. You’re ready to buy one! But which type? Will you go with a convertible or a coupe? We’ll help you weigh the pros and cons of convertibles and coupes to find your best ride. Then we’ll help you compare your best auto financing rates!

Convertible or Coupe?

Buying a Convertible

A convertible sports car has a retractable roof. The roof can be folded down or removed either partially or entirely.

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PROS

You feel it all. Enjoy the sun on your face and the wind in your hair. There’s no fixed roof or door frames to limit your visibility or your fun. Put the top down, your sunglasses on, and hit the road feeling free and open. (Just watch out for the bugs.)

You’re more connected to the personality of the car. Ross McCammon of GQ wasn’t a fan of convertibles, until he drove the Mercedes-Benz C 63 S Cabriolet. Putting the top down meant removing a physical barrier between him and the car’s personality. For the first time he could fully experience “the growl of the start-up and turbo-whine acceleration and the rumbly idling.”

“A convertible doesn’t just make the experience louder and windier,” writes McCammon, “it makes a great car less anesthetized, more awake.” Convertibles offer the ultimate driving experience.

Convertibles are versatile! Most convertibles easily transition back into a sedan with the push of a button.That means you can enjoy the wind in your hair one day and a roof over your head the next when nasty weather hits.

CONS

Convertible roofs can be complex. Convertibles come with complex machinery to bring the top down and back up. If any of these pieces or parts break, you could be in for a big repair bill. Just think–what if your convertible top got stuck in the down position during a rainy week? Do you stop driving?

Convertibles can fall prey to “chassis shudder.” A car’s fixed roof plays a major role in its structural support system. Without a fixed roof, a car can succumb to a condition called “chassis shudder” or “scuttle shake.” This condition makes any uneven road feel even bumpier. Your smooth ride becomes shaky.

Convertibles can be expensive. If affordability is important to you, you might want to think twice about buying a convertible. They tend to be $5,000 to $9,000 more expensive, on average, than comparable sedans or coupes, writes Nationwide.

Buying a Coupe

Coupes have sleek, sloping rooflines, two doors, and two functional seats up front, plus two tiny seats in the back. They have a full-on metal roof rather than a large hole behind the top of the windshield where a convertible soft-top goes.

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PROS

Amazing handling. The fixed roof and extra rigidity of a coupe leads to better handling than a convertible. Coupes are also lighter than convertibles since they aren’t carrying all the mechanisms that bring the top up and down.  

Coupes are the epitome of style. Let’s be honest. Some convertibles look less than sleek with the top up. “The coupe has style, not just because of how it looks,” writes CarsGuide, “but because of that devil-may-care absence of drudgery and practicality.”

Coupes are lithe, sleek, and muscular. “With the exception of very few convertibles, no other car will look as good as a coupe,” continues CarsGuide.

Coupes are fun to drive, rain or shine. No need to put an end to a great drive because of a little rain. Since a coupe has a fixed roof, there’s no need to pull over and raise the top when the weather takes a turn for the worse.

They’re cheaper than convertibles. For the most part, couples are cheaper than their convertible counterparts. Plus, there’s no need to worry about any complex roof mechanisms breaking after a few years.

CONS

Space is hard to come by. Don’t expect to enjoy a lot of space…anywhere in the car. In the front, sloping rooflines make coupes especially tough for tall drivers to enjoy. Rear-seat passengers have even less space. A coupe’s rear seats may work for younger children, but these seats are usually little more than a shelf with seatbelts. And cargo space? Don’t even think about packing the trunk for an extended vacation. You’ll be lucky to manage a few bags of groceries.

The top doesn’t come off. A fixed roof means the only way you’ll be feeling the sun on your cheeks and the wind in your hair is if you roll the windows down.  

Take the first step in buying a sports car

Which sports car will you buy? Convertible or coupe? We’re all about comparison shopping, which is why we provide you with up to four new car loan options to review at your leisure. Whichever performance vehicle you choose to drive, help make sure you get a great deal on financing by comparing your loan options first. myAutoloan can help you get in the driver’s seat of the sports car you want. Apply for a new car loan and compare your offers today!